Sourdough Multigrain Toasting Bread

For a while now I have been experimenting with multigrain sourdough bread. I started with a recipe from the King Arthur Flour Web Site that I tweaked and scaled up with varying degrees of success.  Finally I decided to reverse-engineer the recipe and build my own version from scratch. Using the metric unit option on the web site and converting volumetric units to weight gave me this basic list of ingredients:

Sourdough starter

156 grams

Water

152 grams

Oil

14 grams

Sugar

14 grams

Salt

7 grams

All-purpose flour

163 to 177 grams

Potato flour

43 grams

Whole wheat flour

57 grams

Instant dry yeast

6 grams

 

Averaging out the weight of all-purpose flour and assuming 100% hydration sourdough starter containing all-purpose flour I came up with the following baker’s percentages:

Flour

348 grams

100%

All-purpose flour

248 grams

71%

Potato flour

43 grams

12%

Whole wheat flour

57 grams

17%

Water

230 grams

67%

Oil

14 grams

4%

Sugar

14 grams

4%

Salt

7 grams

2%

Instant dry yeast

6 grams

1.7%

 

That showed me that the formula mass fraction is 1.78. So, to make four 500 grams loaves, as is my wont, I would need to start with 1123 grams of flour (2000/1.78).

In designing my own recipe I began, somewhat arbitrarily, with 250 grams of sourdough started and I used a somewhat different mix of flours. I reduced the amount of sugar and yeast a bit. I also added a couple eggs, adjusting the amount of water and oil accordingly. (Eggs are 76% water and 9.5% fat.) Also, the formula mass changed a bit so I had to increase the amount of flour to compensate. I confess that I did not weigh out each type of flour individually. I simply zeroed the scale under my mixing bowl then added ⅓-cup scoops of each flour—two for the whole wheat—and poured in bread flour until I had a total of 1136 grams.

As usual, note that the metric and English measures are roughly equivalent but not identical. Use one or the other but do not mix them up. I use metric quantities so those are the ones I can vouch for.

Ingredients

 

Sourdough starter

250 grams

1 cup

Warm water (45°C, 100°F)

550 milliliters

2¼ cups

Sugar

34 grams

3 Tablespoons

Salt

23 grams

5 teaspoons

Vegetable oil

35 grams

2½ Tablespoons

Eggs

2 large

2 large

Instant dry yeast

11 grams

1 Tablespoon

Oatmeal

50 grams

⅓ cup

Rye flour

50 grams

⅓ cup

Millet flour

50 grams

⅓ cup

Potato flour

50 grams

⅓ cup

Buckwheat flour

50 grams

⅓ cup

Whole wheat flour

100 grams

⅔ cup

Unbleached white bread flour

786 grams

6 cups

Method

Optional: put the oatmeal in a food processor and process to a coarse powder.

In the bowl of a heavy-duty stand mixer fitted with the flat paddle, combine the sourdough starter, warm water, sugar, salt, oil, and eggs on medium speed. Sprinkle on the yeast and stir in with a fork. Change to the dough hook. Add the flours bowl and knead on the recommended speed setting for your mixer until the dough starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl then five minutes more. The dough will be quite sticky. Scoop it onto a floured surface and, with floured hands, knead lightly and form into a ball.

Warm a large, heavy earthenware or glass bowl with hot water then dry and pour in enough oil to just cover the bottom. Place the ball of dough it in the bowl, and roll it around so that it is evenly coated with the oil. Put a piece of plastic wrap loosely directly on the dough, cover the bowl with a kitchen towel, and set aside to proof until doubled in size, about one to one and a half hours depending on the temperature.

At the end of proofing punch down the dough and divide it into four equal portions. Form the loaves and place them in the bread pans, lightly oiled unless non-stick. Cover with a towel and allow to rise again until the dough is about 2 cm (1 inch) above the sides of the pan.

Bake in a 190°C (375°F) oven to for about 35 minutes. The best way to determine doneness is with a thermometer; the center of the loaf should be between 90°C and 95°C (195°F and 200°F).

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