Tag Archives: chicken

Tinga de Pollo y Papas

Most of what we in the United States think of as Mexican food is derived from the post-conquest cuisines of the border states of Chihuahua and Sonora. The Spanish influence is seen in the heavy use of cheese and meat which were virtually unknown in pre-Columbia Mesoamerica.  Farther south in Puebla and Oaxaca the food retains more of its traditional character. Chef and cookbook author Rick Bayless champions this distinctly more interesting cuisine. This recipe, which I adapted from Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen (New York: Scribner, 1996), pp 322-323, is an example from Puebla. Traditionally, tinga does not contain potatoes but Bayless’s use of them gives the dish an interesting texture and flavor. And, after all, potatoes are in the same botanical family and originated in the same area of South America as do tomatoes. In Mexico City, tinga is served on crispy tostadas topped with queso fresco and a slice of avocado. I usually present it with a plate of warm corn tortillas, shredded sharp cheddar, and avocado if I have some.

Ingredients

Garlic, unpeeled

3 or more cloves

Canned chipotles en adobo

2 or more to taste

Tomatoes, diced or whole

1 14-ounce can

Chicken fat, oil, lard, or combination

30 milliliters (2 Tablespoons) divided use

Chicken thighs, skinless*

2

Boiling potatoes

3 or 4 medium, about 250 grams (½ pound)

Onion, yellow or white

1 medium, about 125 grams (¼ pound)

Dried oregano, preferably Mexican

1 teaspoon

Salt

To taste

Tortillas, corn or flour, to serve

3 or 4 per person

Avocado slices and cheese, to garnish

To taste

* bone-in are best.

 Method

Put the garlic cloves, unpeeled, in a small dry skillet over medium heat, turning from time to time, until they have softened. When cool enough to handle, remove the peels and put into a food processor or blender along with the chipotles and tomatoes with their juice. Process to a smooth puree.

Warm 15 milliliters (1 Tablespoon) of the fat in a heavy sauce pan over medium-high heat. When nearly smoking, pour in the puree and cook, stirring often, until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes.

Lower the heat to medium-low and submerge the chicken thighs in the sauce. Cover and simmer until the meat is done, about 25 minutes. Remove the thighs to a plate, leaving as much sauce as possible behind. When cool enough to handle, pull the meat from the bones in large shreds.

Using the coarse grating disk of the food processor or a hand grater, shred the potatoes. Roll them into a kitchen towel and squeeze out as water as possible. Thinly slice the onion. Add the remaining fat to a large non-stick skillet (I use a 12” one) over medium heat. Cook the potatoes and onions, tossing or stirring regularly, until well browned. Pour in the sauce, sprinkle on the oregano, and fold in the chicken. Heat through and season to taste with salt.

Turn the finished tinga into a warmed serving bowl. Present with warmed tortillas and garnishes.

Fricassée

Some might be prompted to ask, “Fricassée of what?” but to add anything to fricassée would be redundant since, as the authoritative Larousse Gastronomique puts it, “In modern French usage, the word fricassée applies almost exclusively to a method of preparing poultry in a white sauce.” [Larousse Gastronomique, (New York: Crown Publishers, 1961), 430-431]. Most commonly in the United States it is a stew of leftover poultry with vegetables and gravy. Technically a white sauce contains milk or cream but I find that to be gilding the lily, so to speak. The easiest approach is to figure out how much leftover chicken, or turkey, you have and scale the recipe accordingly. The quantities listed below make a generous pot full that should feed at least four.

Ingredients

 

Schmaltz, olive oil, or a combination

2 tablespoons

30 ml

Onion, diced

8 ounces

250 grams

Carrot, diced

6 ounces

175 grams

Celery, diced

4 ounces

125 grams

Flour

2 tablespoons

30 ml

Chicken broth or stock

2 – 3 cups

500 – 750 ml

Tarragon leaves, dried

½ teaspoon

2½ ml

Thyme leaves, dried

1 teaspoon

5 ml

Parsley leaves, dried

1 tablespoon

15 ml

Potatoes, medium dice

12 ounces

350 grams

Peas

4 ounces

125 grams

Cooked chicken in bite-sized pieces

1 pound

500 grams

Salt and pepper

to taste

to taste

Method

Put the schmaltz or oil into a Dutch oven or large skillet over medium heat and sweat the onions, carrots, and celery for about 5 minutes or until softened but not browned. Sprinkle on the flour and stir to make a roux. Cook for about 2 minutes then add stock a bit at a time stirring until each addition comes to a boil. Continue to add stock until the gravy has a nice consistency. Stir in the herbs then add the potatoes, peas, and chicken. Add more stock if needed to just cover everything. Bring to a gentle boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, covered, for about 30 minutes. Check to see that the potatoes are done. If the gravy is too thin, uncover, turn the heat up to medium for a few minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Coq au vin

This classic French braise is almost certainly derived from a peasant dish. It would have been made in a large cauldron over an open hearth and once an ingredient went in it did not come back out until the dish was done. Similarly the wine would probably have been rather rough and a few days past drinkability. I have tried to find a middle ground between the farm and the haute cuisine restaurant, eschewing some of the more precious touches that have crept into the recipe. After all, this was originally a way to make a “retired” laying chicken tender. I’m sure it is still best made with a tough old bird full of flavor. But, alas, such are nearly impossible to procure today. I like to use leg quarters rather than whole chicken because the breast meat of today’s young frying chickens is just too delicate for the long cooking this recipe requires. Although some insist that one must use a good wine for cooking, I find that a reasonable box or jug wine is just fine. Traditionally the sauce was thickened with chicken blood mixed with pounded liver and brandy; modern recipes use beurre manie. Rice flour works well if you can to make the dish gluten-free. Be sure to allow plenty of time for the chicken to cook, especially if you are using an older bird otherwise it will be tough.

Ingredients

 

Bacon

60 grams

2 ounces (about 2 rashers)

Chicken fat, butter, or oil

15 milliliters

1 Tablespoon

Chicken pieces

2 kilograms, approx.

5 pounds, approx.

Pearl onions

120 grams

4 ounces

Carrot, diced

60 grams

2 ounces

Celery, diced

60 grams

2 ounces

Garlic, minced

6 cloves

6 cloves

Mushrooms, thickly sliced

120 gram

8 ounces

Cognac

65 milliliters

¼ cup

Dry red wine

about 500 milliliters

about 2 cups

Dried thyme

5 milliliters

1 teaspoon

Salt

to taste

to taste

Freshly ground pepper

to taste

to taste

Butter, unsalted, softened

30 grams

2 Tablespoons

Flour

30 grams

2 Tablespoons

Method

Preheat oven to 160°C (325°F).

Cut the bacon into lardons, i.e. pieces about the size of matchstick. If you have sliced bacon cut it crosswise into 3 mm (⅛-inch pieces). Heat the fat in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat and render the bacon until crispy. Remove to a bowl leaving as much fat behind as possible.

Turn the heat up a bit and, working in batches, brown the chicken pieces well on all sides. Remove to a plate and set aside.

Reduce the heat to medium. Sweat the onions, carrots, and celery until they begin to soften. Add the garlic and mushrooms. Continue to cook the mushrooms give off their liquid.

Return the chicken pieces to the pot and pour in the brandy. Turn off the vent hood, if it is on. and light the vapors with a long match. When the flames die down, add the wine to just cover the chicken. Return the lardons to the pot and season everything with thyme, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover, and place in the hot oven. Bake for about 30 minutes—several hours for an old bird. Remove the cover and return the pot to the oven for another 15 minutes.

Skim the fat off of the liquid and add to the softened butter. Mix in the flour to make a smooth paste, beurre manie. Stir into the broth and bring to a boil to thicken.

Serve hot over noodles or potatoes. Or, best of all, by itself with some crusty French bread.

Thai Chicken and Summer Squash Curry

Known in French as courgette, summer squash is one of my favorite vegetables. There are so many ways to prepare it from stewed into ratatouille to sliced and grilled or even just cubed and eaten raw. And, if you are careful not to overcook it into mushy bits it is very good in light Thai-style curries. I suspect that this recipe would most authentically be made with the golf-ball-sized green eggplant popular in Thailand, but this combination is well worth a try. Besides the aforementioned eggplant, one could use zucchini or any other of the summer squashes in this recipe.

Note that I use rather a lot of squash for the amount of meat. That is because I am cutting back on meat partly because it is better for the environment and partly because I believe recipes like this are more authentic with less reliance on protein. Feel free to use more chicken if you wish.

You can buy green curry paste and coconut milk at any Asian market and at most larger American supermarkets or you can make them yourself. Lemongrass is readily available in Asian markets as well and many supermarkets now carry it. I have not seen fresh kaffir lime leaves in my area so I use shredded ones that come in jars. Again, they are generally available in Asian markets and some American grocery stores. If you cannot find them, just leave them out.

Yield: two servings with rice

Ingredients

 

Chicken cubes*

250 grams

8 ounces

Oil

30 milliliters

2 Tablespoons

Green curry paste

45 milliliters

3 Tablespoons

Lemongrass**

1 stalk

1 stalk

Kaffir lime leaves, chopped, optional

15 milliliters

1 Tablespoon

Fish sauce

60 milliliters

¼ cup

Palm sugar***

60 milliliters

¼ cup

Coconut milk

400 milliliters

1⅔ cup

Summer squash in bite-sized cubes

1 medium (500 grams)

1 medium (1 pound)

* thigh and/or breast meat

** or substitute 30 milliliters (2 Tablespoons) lemon juice

*** or substitute light brown sugar

Method

Heat the oil in a wok or large pan and fry the curry paste for a minute or two until very fragrant. Add the chicken and stir fry until no longer pink on the outside. Bruise the lemongrass with the side of a knife then put it into the pan along with the kaffir lime leaves, if using, fish sauce, palm sugar or substitute, and coconut milk. Bring to a boil and simmer, uncovered, until the chicken is nearly cooked through—about 20 minutes.

Mix in the squash, making sure that they are all in the liquid. Simmer for an additional 10 minutes or until the squash are tender but still firm.

Remove the lemongrass stalk and serve over steamed jasmine rice.

 

Adapted from: http://australian.food.com/recipe/easy-thai-chicken-summer-squash-curry-200808?mode=us&scaleto=3.0&st=null

Chicken Saag

Every culture, it seems, has a dish incorporating chicken and greens. In northern India and Pakistan it is variously called murgh saagwala, saag murgh, or palak murgh: murgh meaning chicken, saag referring to greens in general, and palak being specifically spinach. Aromatic but mildly spiced, this is a south Asian dish to appeal to even the most timid palate. Try it with collards, kale, or even mustard greens for variety. It is best made with fresh greens but frozen work almost as well. Traditionally, it is served with naan but it is equally good with rice, or both. A dollop of yogurt is a nice finishing touch.

I adapted this recipe from Rafi Fernandez, ed., 1000 Recipes: Indian, Chinese, Thai, and Asian (London: Hermes House, an imprint of Anness Publishing, Ltd., 2009), 177.

Makes two servings with bread or rice

Ingredients

 

Spinach, frozen chopped

140 grams

5 ounces

Ginger paste

15 milliliters

1 Tablespoon

Garlic

1 or 2 cloves

1 or 2 cloves

Green chili (optional)

1 or 2

1 or 2

Oil or ghee

15 milliliters

1 Tablespoon

Bay leaves

2 small

2 small

Black peppercorns

5 milliliters

1 teaspoon

Onion, finely chopped

1 medium

1 medium

Diced canned tomato

½ 14-ounce can

½ 14-ounce can

Curry powder*

10 milliliters

2 teaspoons

Chili powder** (optional)

5 milliliters

1 teaspoon

Salt

to taste

to taste

Nonfat Greek yogurt

45 milliliters

3 Tablespoons

Chicken thighs, cubed

220 grams

8 ounces

* In place of a commercial preparation, grind together 10 milliliters (2 teaspoons) turmeric, and 5 milliliters (1 teaspoon) each cumin seed, coriander seed, fenugreek seed, and fennel seed.  

** Indian chili powder, called mirch, not Mexican chili powder, or cayenne powder.

Method

Microwave the spinach for about 2 minutes until thawed and cooked. Put into a food processor along with the ginger, garlic, and chili, if using. Process to a thick purée, adding a bit of water if needed. Set aside.

Heat the oil or ghee in a large, heavy pan over medium heat. Fry the bay leaves and peppercorns for 2 minutes. Add the onion and fry, stirring from time to time, until well browned, about 6 to 8 minutes. Add in the tomatoes and fry for another 5 minutes. Season with the curry powder, chili powder if using, and salt. Stir in the spinach purée and enough water to make a thick sauce. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 more minutes.

Stir in the yogurt into the sauce, at bit at a time to make a smooth sauce. Add chicken thigh pieces, cover, and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, or until the chicken is done.

Cuisses de Poulet au Vin Rouge

This braise of chicken thighs in red wine is nothing more, or less, than a simplified version of the classic Coq au Vin, hence the fancy French name. Unlike the traditional recipe which is best made with a tough old laying hen cooked for hours to make it tender, this version using boneless or bone-in thighs cooks rather quickly making it suitable for a weeknight dinner. However, unlike the original, I would be reluctant to make it in a slow-cooker for fear of reducing the more tender meat to mush. If you want to be really authentic, brown the chicken in bacon fat instead of oil and butter. Be sure not to skimp on the thyme—its flavor is the essence of the dish—but don’t be afraid to use dried if you do not have fresh. I would use about a teaspoon in place of the four sprigs. Serve with boiled potatoes.

Serves 2 generously

Ingredients

4 chicken thighs, boneless and skinless (or not)

Flour

Salt and pepper

Olive oil and/or butter

1 onion, thinly sliced

1 carrots, diced

250 g (8 oz.) white mushrooms, quartered or sliced depending on size

2 cloves garlic, minced

4 sprigs fresh thyme

1 sprig fresh savory (optional)

½ 15-ounce can diced tomatoes

125 ml (½ cup) red wine

Flour and water slurry, as needed

Method

Season a quantity of flour (I use rice flour for a gluten free dish) with salt and pepper then dredge the chicken. Heat the oil and/or butter in a lidded braisier or Dutch oven over a medium high flame. Working in batches if need be, brown the chicken thoroughly on each side, adding a bit more oil as needed. Set aside.  

Reduce the heat to medium-low, adjust the fat in the pan to about a tablespoon, and sweat the onion and carrots until softened but not colored. Add the mushrooms, garlic, and a pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms express their moisture.  Stir in the tomatoes and wine then add the herbs. Cook, stirring occasionally for a few minutes to blend the flavors. Return the chicken to the pan submerging it into the sauce, adding a bit more wine if needed. Cover and simmer for about 25 minutes or until the chicken is done. If the sauce is too thin, stir in some flour slurry (or beurre manié) and boil gently, stirring, until thickened. Remove the thyme twigs and adjust seasoning before serving.

Chicken and Andouille Fricassée

fricasseeThe best everyday meal, in my opinion, is humble food cooked simply. Fricassée in its pure form surely fits that bill. Before it was elaborated and refined by 19th and 20th century chefs and cookbook authors into a complicated and overly rich chicken stew, it was a simple one-pot meal dating back at least to the 1400s. The ingredients would be whatever meats and vegetables were at hand, cooked slowly in an iron cauldron over an open fire, and eaten with a spoon. The key to a good fricassee is to build it up in the pot. Start with the meats, add the aromatics, then a bit of liquid, some root vegetables, and finally, perhaps, some fresh beans or peas. If you make this dish, do not slavishly duplicate what I have done. Choose ingredients to your own taste and pantry. But do observe the sequence of steps. To my mind they are what makes the meal.

INGREDIENTS
1 or 2 Andouille or other smoked sausage links
2 chicken breasts or 3 chicken thighs
1 onion
2 stalks celery
1 small bell pepper or 2 medium carrots—or both
Several cloves garlic
3 or 4 medium boiling potatoes, peeled or not
Green beans, about 100 g or 1 cup
Olive oil, butter, or other cooking fat of your choice
A small handful of fresh herbs—I used tarragon, rosemary, savory, and parsley
250 ml (1 cup) white wine and 250 ml (1 cup) chicken stock or two cups of either
Salt and pepper

METHOD
Cut the sausage into 6 mm (¼ inch) slices and the chicken into 25 mm (1 inch) cubes. Set aside in separate bowls.
Dice the onion, celery, and the pepper and/or carrots. Set aside in the same bowl. Mince the garlic and keep separate.
Cut the potatoes into 20 mm (¾ inch) cubes and set aside.
If need be, string and trim the green beans and set those aside as well.
Put a small amount of oil into large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Sauté the sausage until lightly browned. Add the chicken and brown well—about 10 minutes.
Turn the heat down to medium. Adjust the fat in the pot by adding a bit more oil if needed or by pouring the excess if there is too much. There should be about 30 ml (2 Tablespoons) of fat. Add the aromatics—onion, celery, etc. Sauté until softened—8 minutes or so. Stir in the garlic and cook for another couple of minutes. Toss in the herbs then pour in the liquids, scraping the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon to deglaze it.
Spread the potatoes on top of the ingredients in the pot and bring the broth to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and let simmer for about 20 to 30 minutes or until the potatoes are nearly done. Add the green beans to the pot, recover, and allow them to steam for about 5 minutes.
Remove the lid and turn the heat to medium-high and let the liquid concentrate for about 5 to 10 minutes. Season to taste and serve with crusty bread—and large spoons.

Creole Jambalaya

Classic Louisiana jambalaya comes in two basic varieties, Creole and Cajun, the former being the original dish adapted from the paella of their native land by Spanish Creoles; the latter is probably a rustic variation on the more urban Creole jambalaya. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word jambalaya comes from a Provençal French word, jambalaia, meaning a mish-mash. Traditionally the Creole version contains tomatoes while the Cajun does not. And while Cajun jambalaya usually includes Andouille sausage, the Creole jambalaya recipe in The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book (New York: Random House, 1989) calls for chaurice which is similar to fresh chorizo or Portuguese chourico. Then there is the third, far less common version of Jambalaya, sometimes called white jambalaya, in which the meats and rice are cooked separately. Confused? Don’t worry, so is no less an authority than Emeril Lagasse who uses tomatoes in what he calls Cajun jambalaya.

In this recipe I have tried to recreate what I think the original jambalaya probably looked and tasted like by using ingredients that would have been available to colonial era Creoles to make what is basically paella with Caribbean spices. The proportions of the various meats are not important; mine is a bit heavy on chicken only because I package chicken for the freezer in half-pound packages. I used chicken thighs because I think they stand up to other flavors better but you could certainly use breast meat if you prefer. While most jambalaya recipes build the dish by adding the ingredients on top of each other, I have opted to use the same technique I use for paella which is to cook the various components of the dish separately then combine them for the final cooking. And like paella I cook it uncovered.

Ingredients
1 sausage link, about 3 ounces
3 ounces cooked ham
½ pound boneless chicken thigh
8 medium shrimp, about 6 ounces, thawed if frozen, shelled and deveined (do not discard shells)
4 cups chicken or other stock
1 tablespoon lard, butter, or oil, plus a bit more if needed
1 medium onion, about 4 ounces, chopped
2 ribs celery, about 2 ounces, chopped
1 small bell pepper, about 2 ounces, chopped
2 medium or 4 small tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped, about 6 ounces net
1 habanero or Tobago seasoning pepper, whole
2 cloves garlic, finely sliced
1 teaspoon annatto (achiote) ground
1 teaspoon allspice, ground
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1½ cups long grain white rice
Salt

Method
Slice the sausage into ¼-inch rounds, dice the ham into ½-inch cubes, and cut the chicken into 1-inch cubes. Set each aside separately along with the peeled and deveined shrimp.

Put the chicken stock and shrimp shells into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil then let steep while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

Heat whichever fat you are using in a paella pan or large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. When nearly smoking, add the sausage and brown well. Remove to a bowl leaving as much fat behind as possible. Do the same, separately, with the ham, bowl, chicken, and shrimp.

Reduce the heat to medium and, if needed, add more fat to the pot, perhaps a half a tablespoon. Add the onions, celery, and bell pepper. Sauté until well softened, about five to eight minutes, then add the tomatoes and garlic. Continue to cook, stirring often, until most of the tomato liquid has evaporated. Stir in the spices and cook for a further minute or two.

Add the rice to the spice and vegetable mixture. Fry, stirring constantly, for about three minutes. Strain the stock and pour it over the rice. Arrange first the chicken, ham, sausage, and shrimp over the rice. Press down gently into the stock but do not stir. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer gently, uncovered, until the broth is absorbed, about 20 minutes to one half hour. Taste and adjust salt.

Remove the pan from the heat, cover loosely with a clean kitchen towel, and let rest for five minutes before serving.

Note: this is an update of a recipe I posted in September 2011.

Fricassée

Some might be prompted to ask, “Fricassée of what?” but to add anything to fricassée would be redundant since, as the authoritative Larousse Gastronomique puts it, “In modern French usage, the word fricassée applies almost exclusively to a method of preparing poultry in a white sauce.” [Larousse Gastronomique, (New York: Crown Publishers, 1961), 430-431]. Most commonly in the United States it is a stew of leftover poultry with vegetables and gravy. Technically a white sauce contains milk or cream but I find that to be gilding the lily, so to speak. The easiest approach is to figure out how much leftover chicken, or turkey, you have and scale the recipe accordingly. The quantities listed below make a generous pot full that should feed at least four.

Ingredients

 

Schmaltz, olive oil, or a combination

2 tablespoons

30 ml

Onion, diced

8 ounces

250 grams

Carrot, diced

6 ounces

175 grams

Celery, diced

4 ounces

125 grams

Flour

2 tablespoons

30 ml

Chicken broth or stock

2 – 3 cups

500 – 750 ml

Tarragon leaves, dried

½ teaspoon

2½ ml

Thyme leaves, dried

1 teaspoon

5 ml

Parsley leaves, dried

1 tablespoon

15 ml

Potatoes, medium dice

12 ounces

350 grams

Peas

4 ounces

125 grams

Cooked chicken in bite-sized pieces

1 pound

500 grams

Salt and pepper

to taste

to taste

Method

Put the schmaltz or oil into a Dutch oven or large skillet over medium heat and sweat the onions, carrots, and celery for about 5 minutes or until softened but not browned. Sprinkle on the flour and stir to make a roux. Cook for about 2 minutes then add stock a bit at a time stirring until each addition comes to a boil. Continue to add stock until the gravy has a nice consistency. Stir in the herbs then add the potatoes, peas, and chicken. Add more stock if needed to just cover everything. Bring to a gentle boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, covered, for about 30 minutes. Check to see that the potatoes are done. If the gravy is too thin, uncover, turn the heat up to medium for a few minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Chicken Thighs with Root Vegetables

Consistent with my repeated admonition that one should complete all preparatory work before beginning to cook I have altered the format of my recipes a bit. I welcome feedback on the change.

chicken thighs with root vegetablesIf you like crispy-skinned chicken you will love this simple recipe. I pan-roast the chicken using the common restaurant technique of searing it in a very hot skillet then finishing it in the oven. Since the oven is already hot, I accompany it with roasted root vegetables. The quantities and types of vegetable I specified in the recipe are just what I used on one occasion; feel free to alter them to your taste. To avoid overcooking, be sure that the vegetables are nearly done before starting the chicken.

Ingredients

 

Firm potatoes (2 medium)

about 1 pound

about 450 grams

Carrots (2 medium)

6 ounces

170 grams

Beets

6 ounces

170 grams

Onions

12 ounces

340 grams

Garlic

2 or 3 cloves

2 or 3 cloves

Fresh rosemary leaves

1 tablespoon

15 milliliters

Olive oil

2 tablespoons

30 milliliters

Chicken thighs, skin on, bone in

12 ounces

340 grams

Cooking oil

1 teaspoon

5 milliliters

Salt and pepper

to taste

to taste

Preparation

Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C). Position one rack near the bottom and one in the top third of the oven.

Scrub or peel the potatoes and cut into 1-inch (25 mm) cubes. Scrape the carrots and cut into piece about the size of the potatoes. Peel and cube the beets. Peel the onions and halve or quarter so that they too are similar in size to the rest of the vegetables. Mince the garlic and chop the rosemary leaves. Pour the olive oil into a large bowl. Add the garlic, rosemary, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss the vegetables with the seasoned oil and place in a shallow roasting pan (I use a half-sheet pan).

Rinse and dry the chicken thighs. Season with salt and pepper.

Cooking

Roast the vegetables on the bottom rack of the oven, turning with tongs from time to time.

After the vegetables have roasted for about 20 minutes, place a cast iron skillet over high heat until smoking. Add the cooking oil and immediately put in the chicken thighs, skin side down. Sear for 2 or 3 minutes then turn over and place the skillet on the upper rack in the oven. Cook until done, about 8 to 10 minutes.